Draw A Daffodil Class March 13

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When drawing a daffodil, it might help to think of it as a cup-shaped flower resting inside another 6-petaled flower.

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The petals that face 12, 8, and 4 are above the other 3 and hide parts of the petals facing 6, 10, and 2.

If the flower is facing front, the petal arrangement would look like the above diagram.

When the flower angles away from the front, the petals are also arranged at an angle.

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In the above diagram, the clock is at an angle; and the petals twist and curl in a more natural fashion.

Before you draw any of the petals in detail, it is wise to loosely sketch the entire flower, indicating  approximately where all the petals, stem, leaves, etc., will be drawn.  Then, go back into the drawing and begin to refine petal by petal and/or part by part.

Because we relate to the clock viewed directly, I have superimposed a normal clock,  You can draw the petals relative to straight clock. Part of one petal lies along the 12 o’clock to center line.  It is curled and areas twist away frome the ight.  The part lying on the 12 to center line sticks out farthest and catches the most light.  Because this projecting area catches the light, it blocks light from the areas behind and beneath it.  When you draw the petal, be sure that you leave enough room for the stem, leaves, and other petals.  [If you lightly sketched the entire flower before you begin to draw, you will be more apt to allow adequate space].

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Now, draw another, seemingly shorter petal over the line that would go over the line from center to 6 o’clock–spreading toward 7.  Part of the petal dips back toward 5.  This petal seems shorter because it is farther away from the viewer’s eyes.

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Now we’ll add another petal that is in front of the one drawn previously.  The left edge of this petal curves and forms a flap. This petal is drawn to the right of the line from center to 6.  The first view does not show the petal drawn before this one.

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This view shows both of the bottom petals

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Draw the next petal toward  o’clock.  This petal seems even shorter because it is even farther away from the viewer.

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If you don’t see the bottom petals, the 9-petal would look like this:

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Draw an upper petal over the 12 o’clock area–reaching almost over to 11.  The petal curves forward, formig a triangular flap at the top. This triangular tip catches the light.  Shadows would fall immediately below this tip. The petal in front of this petal blocks part of its visibility.  There would also be shadows because of the petal that extends and blocks.

The cup that rests in the center of the petals is one piece.  There are long grooves and the end is jagged.  If only the font of the cup were visible, it would look like this:

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If all of the cup is showing, it would look like something like this–with the front covering much of the back. [This is overly simplified.  The jagged edge is much more complex]

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This is an overly simplified diagram showing both the front and the back of the cup

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